Lindsay Grice
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Riding patterns and tests. Clinic with Lindsay Grice, Dressage judge Susan Fraser. Nova Scotia E.F.

Classical and Western dressage. What's the difference? Tips on riding the current popular western discipline patterns: competitive trail, horsemanship, the new ranch horse pleasure patterns.…Continue

Started Jul 30, 2013

Reinforcement

 Reinforcement: An outcome a horse receives which increases the likelihood that a response will occur again.Following a behaviour with a reinforcer (an outcome or a payoff) will cause it to happen…Continue

Tags: horse trainer, horse training, positive reinforcement, reinforcement, lindsay grice

Started Jun 5, 2011

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A Bit About Me and my Horse(s)
Lindsay Grice is a riding coach, horse trainer, equine behaviour lecturer and horse show judge. Lindsay also serves as an equine expert witness, equine legal consultant.
“I love helping riders solve their horse puzzles based on the science of how horses think and learn.” She says
Why do horses do what they do? Lindsay’s shared workshops and seminars on Equine Behaviour and Learning for provincial equine associations, therapeutic riding facilities and courses offered by University of Guelph.
She is an AQHA specialized judge, Equestrian Canada judge and a Provincial Hunter/Jumper judge.
Serving on an Equestrian Canada judging committee, she teaches seminars in General Performance (multi discipline, multi breed) judging.

She teaches clinics on showing, training and judging for horse clubs and private farms.
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canada
Website:
http://www.lgrice.com

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Lindsay Grice's Blog

Nosebands – how tight is too tight?

Standard equipment in English disciplines. Training equipment in western.  While nosebands are designed to prevent bit evasion, in the horse business, we’re inclined to default into thinking “If a little is good, more is better! Are we masking bit evasion without asking WHY the horse might be resisting?



The International Society of Equitation Science responded to the dilemma of cranking nosebands in equine sport with a study and by designing a noseband gauge for competition ring stewards:



“Some equestrian manuals and competition rule books propose that ‘two fingers’ be used as a spacer to guard against over-tightening, but fail to specify where they should be applied or, indeed, the size of the fingers.” 



“When this device was used to check noseband…

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Posted on April 18, 2018 at 6:29pm

Do horses sense fear?

Have you ever been unsettled by your classmate’s handwringing before an exam? Or the patient before you holding their jaw as they emerge from the dentist’s room?

Its not that you sense or smell fear. You’re reading their body language….and catching it like an infection.

Riders often tell me that their horse senses they’re nervous. I ask them if they think their nervousness changes the way they ride and move around the horse.

“Do our horses appear to act up because they’re nervous and anxious when we are? Or is it, rather, because when we’re nervous, our muscles get tenser and our aids become completely different from what the horse is used to? To me that makes more logical sense.” Dr. Katrina Merkies, PhD, associate professor and equine program coordinator,…

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Posted on April 11, 2018 at 8:40pm

Brakes

Reliable brakes – not just for reiners!  Anyone ever been thankful for a horse who had a braking safety feature installed? An accident averted, an equitation class won, an opportunity to re-group before things got “out of hand”?

I’ve been thankful for horses that know “whoa” before they steps on the reins, unseat a novice, or bump into another horse in the warm up ring. A nifty tool in training when a horse’s tension’s rising, and BEFORE he hits flight mode!

On another note, who doesn’t wish we’d put the brakes on our tongues from time to time!

Indeed, we all make many mistakes. For if we could control our tongues, we  could also control ourselves in every other way. We can make a large horse go wherever we want by means of a small bit in its mouth. in…

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Posted on March 19, 2018 at 4:00pm

The horse’s flight response. Practice makes perfect.

Flight response is a prey animal’s instinct to flee from perceived danger.



Dr Andrew Mclean says “A structure deep inside the brain called the amygdala, sorts out stimuli as to whether they are fearful or not. Fearful stimuli receive special recognition by the brain in terms of remembering - unlike other information, once learned, fearful responses are not forgotten. You can layer new responses on top, so they become less easily retrieved, but fearful responses need careful training to keep the lid on them.”



A horse doesn’t get a 2nd chance in nature to make a judgment error – when a threat is perceived he flees to a safe distance and checks things out from there. Thus, while most skills are learned by trial and error, it only takes one trial…

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Posted on March 12, 2018 at 4:00pm

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At 4:49pm on September 12, 2011, Frank Sheridan said…
Hows And Whys are not easily explained but you make it simple
At 3:22pm on May 31, 2011, Jackie Cochran said…
Welcome to Barnmice Lindsay!  I enjoyed your blog.
At 10:28pm on May 30, 2011, Barnmice Admin said…
Welcome Lindsay, so glad you've joined us! :)
 
 
 

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