The Kelpies, Scotland. Sculpture by Andy Scott

The Kelpies are 30 metre high horse head sculptures, standing next to the Forth and Clyde Canal, Scotland and they look absolutely awesome. The sculptures are designed by sculptor Andy Scott and are due to be completed in October 2013. They form a dramatic gateway at the eastern entrance to the Forth and Clyde canal, and the new canal extension built as part of The Helix land transformation project. The Kelpies are a monument to horse powered heritage across Scotland.
The sculptures will open to the public in April 2014. As part of the project, they will have their own visitor centre, and sit beside a newly developed canal turning pool and extension. This canal extension reconnects the Forth & Clyde Canal with the River Forth, and improves navigation between the East and West of Scotland.

There's been some debate in response to the video as to whether the Kelpies are in Falkirk or Grangemouth. I'm afraid I don't know but they are magnificent.
Video by Alan Corrie.

The music is courtesy of last.fm and features:
Artist: RQTN
Title: Aller Simple

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Comment by Marlene Thoms on April 11, 2014 at 12:24pm

Folklore

In mythology, the kelpie is described as a strong and powerful horse. It is a white and sky blue colour and appeared as a lost pony, but could be identified by its constantly dripping mane. Its mane and tail are a bit curly. Its skin was said to be like that of a seal, smooth but as cold as death when touched. Kelpies were said to transform into beautiful women to lure men into their traps. They created illusions to keep themselves hidden, keeping only their eyes above water to scout the surface.

The fable of the kelpie varies by region. The kelpie's mane is said to be a sky blue colour. The water horse is a common form of the kelpie, said to lure humans into the water to drown them. The water horse would encourage people to ride on its back, and once its victims fell into its trap, the water horse's skin would become adhesive and the horse would bear the victim into the river, dragging them to the bottom of the water and devouring them—except the heart or liver. A common Scottish tale is the story of nine children lured onto a kelpie's back, while a tenth kept his distance. The kelpie chased the tenth child, but he escaped. Another more gruesome variation on this tale is that the tenth child simply stroked the kelpie's nose but, when his hand stuck to it, he took a knife from his pocket and cut his own hand off, cauterizing it with wood from a nearby fire

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