Lindsay Grice
  • Female
  • ontario
  • Canada
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Riding patterns and tests. Clinic with Lindsay Grice, Dressage judge Susan Fraser. Nova Scotia E.F.

Classical and Western dressage. What's the difference? Tips on riding the current popular western discipline patterns: competitive trail, horsemanship, the new ranch horse pleasure patterns.…Continue

Started Jul 30, 2013

Reinforcement

 Reinforcement: An outcome a horse receives which increases the likelihood that a response will occur again.Following a behaviour with a reinforcer (an outcome or a payoff) will cause it to happen…Continue

Tags: horse trainer, horse training, positive reinforcement, reinforcement, lindsay grice

Started Jun 5, 2011

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A Bit About Me and my Horse(s)
Coach, trainer, equine behaviour lecturer and judge, Lindsay Grice, has prepared horses and riders for wins at major horse shows in the US and Canada for over 20 years. Starting her career on the hunter A circuit, she continues to actively compete in both english and western events, specializing now in the AQHA circuit.

Lindsay teaches Equine Behaviour for the University of Guelph Performance Horse Handler course. In her popular clinics, she draws on the principles of equine psychology and sports psychology to bridge the communication gap between horses and riders and explains both the “hows” and “whys” of training and showing.

Lindsay is an Equine Canada judge and AQHA specialized judge, and Provincial Hunter/Jumper judge. She's a certified Equine Canada and NCCP (multi event) coach.
Country
canada
Website:
http://www.lgrice.com

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Lindsay Grice's Blog

Yielding to pressure – you, not your horse!

"Just get back on! You don't want to lose your nerve."

"Why not enter the trail class?  You're at the show anyway."

"Are you coming out on a hack with us?"

Well-meaning invitations, but sadly, invitations into situations  for which neither you nor your horse are quite prepared.

Have you ever felt pressure to push the boundaries with your horse?

I am a professional bubble-burster. As clinician and coach, I act as the voice of caution. As a show judge, I can only wince.

We'd never suggest a friend commute into Toronto with unreliable brakes and steering.  Yet, it makes me sad to see at a few horses at every show,  in the pressure cooker of an unfamiliar environment without the tools needed for the task.

I've been there- felt the pressure from a …

Continue

Posted on July 29, 2016 at 8:30am

When evidence collides with tradition: part 2

Traditions run deep in the horse world. From tack to training, to the terms we use ...WHY? - I figure it doesn't hurt to ask! Hey sometimes I've found there's a good reason - someone way smarter than me "invented the wheel" and doesn't need ME to re-invent it :) So I'll keep asking...



Like the new bride whose husband asks "Why do you cut off the ends of the roast before you cook it? — that's the best part!" She answers, "That's the way my mother always made it." 

So when the guy raises the question at Christmas dinner, mother in law shrugs, "that's the only way it will fit in my pan!"



What about you?- anything you do differently with your horses after doing some snooping into the research? Or with a few years of wisdom under your…

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Posted on July 22, 2016 at 10:00am

"That's just the way we've always done it…"

Traditions persist in the horse world. Does anyone know why flat classes traditionally start on the left rein?  I caused a little stir recently, at an open hunter show by starting on the right rein in an equitation class. Can you think of other enduring (though puzzling) equine traditions?

Sometimes we get stuck in a rut, until evidence leads us to look outside. I do like how AQHA is encouraging judges to mix up the gait calls and direction of flat classes. I do this regularly when I judge and appreciate it as an exhibitor. Ring sourness is a problem with show horses. Horses learn by association, anticipating what's next. This is classical conditioning – the same principle causing my cat to appear at the sound of the can opener.

Posted on July 18, 2016 at 9:30am

Horse Whispering

As a stereotypically reserved Canadian, judging a horse show last fall in Israel, it was culture shock.  Animated and passionate in communicating, what an initially rattled me (what’s the commotion??), became  endearing to me.

The big idea behind “horse whispering” is the use of subtle body language and keen observation to communicate with our horses.  And one has to admire top showmanship class exhibitors who have developed a language of discrete cues to speak to their horses –  each signal distinct and preceded by a pre-signal, or “heads-up”.

“Riders may give unintended signals or a conflicting aids making it difficult for a horse to offer the correct response,” writes Dr. Antonia Henderson. “the horse tunes of the rider out, and soliciting an increasingly stronger…

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Posted on June 17, 2016 at 9:00am

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At 4:49pm on September 12, 2011, Frank Sheridan said…
Hows And Whys are not easily explained but you make it simple
At 3:22pm on May 31, 2011, Jackie Cochran said…
Welcome to Barnmice Lindsay!  I enjoyed your blog.
At 10:28pm on May 30, 2011, Barnmice Admin said…
Welcome Lindsay, so glad you've joined us! :)
 
 
 
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