Lindsay Grice
  • Female
  • ontario
  • Canada

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Riding patterns and tests. Clinic with Lindsay Grice, Dressage judge Susan Fraser. Nova Scotia E.F.

Classical and Western dressage. What's the difference? Tips on riding the current popular western discipline patterns: competitive trail, horsemanship, the new ranch horse pleasure patterns.…Continue

Started Jul 30, 2013


 Reinforcement: An outcome a horse receives which increases the likelihood that a response will occur again.Following a behaviour with a reinforcer (an outcome or a payoff) will cause it to happen…Continue

Tags: horse trainer, horse training, positive reinforcement, reinforcement, lindsay grice

Started Jun 5, 2011

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A Bit About Me and my Horse(s)
Coach, trainer, equine behaviour lecturer and judge, Lindsay Grice, has prepared horses and riders for wins at major horse shows in the US and Canada for over 20 years. Starting her career on the hunter A circuit, she continues to actively compete in both english and western events, specializing now in the AQHA circuit.

Lindsay teaches Equine Behaviour for the University of Guelph Performance Horse Handler course. In her popular clinics, she draws on the principles of equine psychology and sports psychology to bridge the communication gap between horses and riders and explains both the “hows” and “whys” of training and showing.

Lindsay is an Equine Canada judge and AQHA specialized judge, and Provincial Hunter/Jumper judge. She's a certified Equine Canada and NCCP (multi event) coach.

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Lindsay Grice's Blog

The horse’s flight response. Practice makes perfect.

Flight response is a prey animal’s instinct to flee from perceived danger.

Dr Andrew Mclean says “A structure deep inside the brain called the amygdala, sorts out stimuli as to whether they are fearful or not. Fearful stimuli receive special recognition by the brain in terms of remembering - unlike other information, once learned, fearful responses are not forgotten. You can layer new responses on top, so they become less easily retrieved, but fearful responses need careful training to keep the lid on them.”

A horse doesn’t get a 2nd chance in nature to make a judgment error – when a threat is perceived he flees to a safe distance and checks things out from there. Thus, while most skills are learned by trial and error, it only takes one trial…


Posted on March 12, 2018 at 4:00pm

Horses and Fences

Don’t give up what you want most for what you want right now.

I had the privilege of speaking to a student group last night- Life Lessons Learned from Horses. From the city, on outdoor education at a local retreat centre, everyone had experienced their first “horse encounter”.

Horses are hard on fences, I told them. They bend them, break them – maybe the grass is greener on the other side…. Every horse person has nursed their share of “fence injuries”!

Kind of like us - when we push the limits, find a loophole, cross the line or take a short- cut, what we think will liberate us might only get us caught up. Or short- cut our…


Posted on March 11, 2018 at 4:11pm

Horse learning: Licking and chewing-takin’ it with a grain of salt

Is it an AHA moment in a horse’s understanding? A sign of submission or a sigh of relief?

Always one to ask questions, I think a little differently about the licking and chewing thing  than I did in earlier years training horses. We recognize this mouth behaviour in a horse after stopping to take a break in an intense training interaction.   It’s like that moment of relief you get when that police car, approaching in your rear view mirror, with sirens blaring, zips by without pulling you over. You swallow and take a deep breath!

Dr. Sue McDonnell explains. When an animal or a person is threatened or acutely stressed, the nervous system switches into alert or fight or flight mode with the sympathetic nervous system. Pain, fear, or…


Posted on February 14, 2018 at 6:55am

De-stress horse handling procedures.

Applying science-based learning principles for any horse training scenario, Dr. Sue McDonnell suggests how to de-stress 5 common stressful vet treatment procedures. It's common for equestrians to unintentionally train avoidance responses using pressure and release in the wrong timing. “We put pressure, the horses react, we back off because we have to because they're big or we weren't prepared, and the horse almost immediately gets into an avoidance cycle,” she said. “Recognize when something is not working, and change your approach before the horse becomes conditioned to avoid."

Article Link - De-stress horse handling procedures

Posted on February 6, 2018 at 6:21pm

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At 4:49pm on September 12, 2011, Frank Sheridan said…
Hows And Whys are not easily explained but you make it simple
At 3:22pm on May 31, 2011, Jackie Cochran said…
Welcome to Barnmice Lindsay!  I enjoyed your blog.
At 10:28pm on May 30, 2011, Barnmice Admin said…
Welcome Lindsay, so glad you've joined us! :)

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