Lindsay Grice
  • Female
  • ontario
  • Canada
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Riding patterns and tests. Clinic with Lindsay Grice, Dressage judge Susan Fraser. Nova Scotia E.F.

Classical and Western dressage. What's the difference? Tips on riding the current popular western discipline patterns: competitive trail, horsemanship, the new ranch horse pleasure patterns.…Continue

Started Jul 30, 2013

Reinforcement

 Reinforcement: An outcome a horse receives which increases the likelihood that a response will occur again.Following a behaviour with a reinforcer (an outcome or a payoff) will cause it to happen…Continue

Tags: horse trainer, horse training, positive reinforcement, reinforcement, lindsay grice

Started Jun 5, 2011

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A Bit About Me and my Horse(s)
Coach, trainer, equine behaviour lecturer and judge, Lindsay Grice, has prepared horses and riders for wins at major horse shows in the US and Canada for over 20 years. Starting her career on the hunter A circuit, she continues to actively compete in both english and western events, specializing now in the AQHA circuit.

Lindsay teaches Equine Behaviour for the University of Guelph Performance Horse Handler course. In her popular clinics, she draws on the principles of equine psychology and sports psychology to bridge the communication gap between horses and riders and explains both the “hows” and “whys” of training and showing.

Lindsay is an Equine Canada judge and AQHA specialized judge, and Provincial Hunter/Jumper judge. She's a certified Equine Canada and NCCP (multi event) coach.
Country
canada
Website:
http://www.lgrice.com

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Lindsay Grice's Blog

Why the judge and your horse will appreciate your “good hands.”

I can still hear my early instructors barking at me. Like any novice, while I focused on keeping my horse going or identifying the right diagonal, my hands would elevate and bounce around. But the more I tried to force them down, the stiffer and more jarring they became. As a coach, I make it a goal to describe the importance of and specifically how to develop elastic arms

1. Good hands deliver a clear “code” to your horse. Are you speaking so your horse is listening?

Riding effectively can be boiled down to a signal/response/ pressure or release system. Your hands send the signal, communicating  messages such as slow, turn and  flex to your horse. Each signal is precise and distinct. When your horse responds to your request, you respond with a reward,…

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Posted on April 24, 2017 at 10:00am

5 reasons why the judge and your horse appreciate good equitation. (Part 1)

 

 I learned equitation fundamentals to the repetitive tune of  “head up, heels down!” trotting around and around  the riding school ring. I aquired the “whats” of riding in those early years, but didn’t get good answers to my “whys!”  It’s a shame – if I’d grasped the logic and the science behind the skills, and how I’d use them in the future, I’d have been more motivated in those drills.

 The essentials of correct rider position cross all disciplines, and there’s a great reason behind every essential.

 

1.Your horse will thank you for going easy on his back.

Researchers now have cool technology to read all pressures, bumps and shifts a horse actually feels while being ridden. After studying this, I’m more intentional than ever of the signals I’m…

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Posted on April 17, 2017 at 10:16am

Gotta love ponies!

Are ponies tougher than horses?

French researchers say so.

Speaking about the ways we can preserve the welfare and sanity of riding lesson horses, Dr. Clémence Lesimple said that poor riding technique has the greatest impact on the presence of injuries, and it also has an effect on stereotypy development. (ie. cribbing and weaving).

“Frequent forage feeding, regular free time in the paddock with other horses, straw bedding, and good riding techniques are also  critical elements for promoting equine welfare in riding facilities,” she said.

“We often hear that ponies are more robust than horses, and our study shows for the first time that they are less inclined to develop signs of poor welfare and that they are more resistant to deleterious equitation.”

Deleterious…

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Posted on February 3, 2017 at 7:00pm

Riding patterns

The more we ride them the better we get at memorizing them. We build upon previous experiences and observations. Our brains are actually changed. We’re learning to learn.

So, if experience goes through the routine, perhaps wisdom says, This is the way things typically go.

 Left lead skills are typically followed by a lead change and some right lead skills.  After jumps to the right come the jumps to the left.  From dressage ring to hunter course to reining pen.  Wise riders are ones who’ve learned to recognize the flow of the show – patterns, schedules and horses – the way things usually work.

Taken a step further, the wise rider not only sees of the rhythms and routines, but applies what she knows.

I love the ancient Hebrew word for wisdom,…

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Posted on January 27, 2017 at 7:00pm

Comment Wall (3 comments)

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At 4:49pm on September 12, 2011, Frank Sheridan said…
Hows And Whys are not easily explained but you make it simple
At 3:22pm on May 31, 2011, Jackie Cochran said…
Welcome to Barnmice Lindsay!  I enjoyed your blog.
At 10:28pm on May 30, 2011, Barnmice Admin said…
Welcome Lindsay, so glad you've joined us! :)
 
 
 
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